Come Up You Fearful Jesuit

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Heard it Before

Posted on February 23, 2012 in Computrons Literature

So other aspects of life continue to keep me busy. I did bother to pick out another source text: Nostromo.

Decoud had died. But he could show an authorization from the mine; and, besides, there was a portentous sign; that the game of children. He gazed down upon each cart; of raised arms in a few coastguard cutters, there were incipient tears in his gig to one and all, like so many chances of existence are involved, a desire to leave things and all the departures and arrivals of the ground of her mind that nothing but a common cause, the symbol of the silver preyed on his way to the highest pitch, his eyes and looked on with compressed lips. The crowd stared literally open-mouthed, lost in Sulaco for a constantly diminishing quantity of snuff out of it (the print was small) he had supposed to be accepted. This feeling made the letters from Sulaco were not a gleam of a night or two.”

“Yes, everybody knows of now. I don’t ask what it behoved him to be alone—with his dead wife with a general and have been something final, and busied herself with a slightly different view,” the doctor asked, eagerly.

“God knows!” said Charles Gould’s polite silence; and when, stopping abruptly, he fell himself shot through the night he made that overland journey from London to Sta. Marta had credited him with an undismayed mind, but with a nail driven into her little feet, in white and enormous moustaches of the mothers with the most absurd fidelity. I am one of the whole Costaguana section of the main body, no stir of formless shapes on the march to Rome he had studied in Rome, and could not conceal her love for Antonia. For all his mad state he recognized his compadre and jumped up as if the tremendous disclosure of this reputation he

I have, however, been thinking about Markov Garden. In particular, I’ve been thinking that a big part of the problem is that in using Ruby’s built-in hash class to keep track of things at the top level, I’m dooming myself to really long insertion times once I get deep into a book (because if a book has a lot of words, you may well have to search through the entire list of keys in order to determine a new word has to receive its own entry.) I’ve been pondering paths around this, and think that I have a couple of reasonable candidates.

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